MTB Rebound Adjuster

The rebound adjustment controls the speed the shock will return to its initial extended state after being compressed upon an impact. If the rebound adjustment is set properly, the rear wheel should keep maximum traction by tracking the ground without catapulting the rider off the bike. You should start in the middle of the adjustment range.

To adjust properly, turn the adjuster one click at a time and take a test ride. The adjustment is more sensitive towards the fully in position (slowest). When the rebound setting gets too slow, the shock absorber will not have time to resume to its initial position when a series of close bumps is encountered. In this case, the bike will run out of travel (packing), possibly bottoming out, and may give the impression of a too soft compression adjustment. When the rebound adjustment is too fast, the rear end of the bike will kick and move from side to side after hitting a series of close bumps and the rider will feel catapulted by the bike.

HOW TO USE IT:

INCREASING THE REBOUND DAMPING (SLOWER RETURN)

To increase the rebound damping, thus making the shock return slower upon an impact, turn the rebound adjuster knob clockwise (screw in). There is about 16 clicks of rebound adjustment.

REDUCING THE REBOUND DAMPING (FASTER RETURN)

To reduce the rebound damping, thus making the shock return faster upon an impact, turn the rebound adjuster knob counterclockwise (unscrew).


 

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